Israeli leftist’s workshop canceled by IfZ club / Workshop eines israelischen Linken wird vom IfZ abgesagt

Incidents, News, Statements

Deutsch

In 2020, a Israeli Jewish leftist living in Leipzig was supposed to give a workshop at a local club, the IfZ (Institut fuer Zukunft). The hosts abruptly cancelled the event, just days before it was scheduled to take place.

The cancellation was based on the speaker’s opinions and on the wording of the workshop description:

Revolutionary Yiddishland: The Unrevised History of the Pre-war European Jewish Left
Before the genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe, and before the State of Israel came to dominate the politics of the remaining Jewish community, a great many young Jewish people in Europe were part of an internationalist Left fighting for the Revolution in Russia and Spain –– and struggling for a better world wherever they were. In this workshop, inspired by the book „Revolutionary Yiddishland,“ we will learn about this lost world and discuss how it was destroyed –– as well as what remains of it today.

The IfZ named two reasons for the cancellation: first, the IfZ found parts of the description “more than questionable” – namely “genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe” and “the State of Israel came to dominate the politics of the remaining Jewish community.

Further, the IfZ found that the speaker had signed an open letter to the city of Leipzig along with other Jewish immigrants living in the city (mostly Israelis.) In their view, this letter “trivialized” BDS, while the IfZ “speaks out against BDS.”

It later turned out that in internal discussion, other “issues” were raised than those which were communicated openly: the speaker’s anti-Zionism and “bizarre opinions,” and a fear that the speaker would use the opportunity to promote views which the IfZ rejects.

In the cancellation message, the IfZ claimed there was need for clarification, but too little time left. They never followed up on this with an offer of dialog. The IfZ indicated they would need some time to clarify their position, but this clarification never materialized either.

JID rejects the personal silencing of Israeli leftists

There are several things that have to be said about this outrageous incident.

Germans silence Jewish narratives

The IfZ group took issue with the speaker’s description of the Shoah: “the genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe.”

From a historical perspective, not a single word of this phrase is particularly controversial. We wonder what exactly is “more than questionable” about it. Regardless, we reject the idea that non-Jewish Germans get to dictate how Jews talk about the German genocide of our people. In fact, we expect and demand they allow Jewish people to speak freely and loudly about this, listen, and engage in dialog – not try to dictate what narrative is permitted.

As for the phrase “the State of Israel came to dominate the politics of the remaining Jewish community” – this is an equally uncontroversial statement, but we are willing to assume this is a simple misunderstanding due to the language barrier. Perhaps the IfZ read “came to dominate” as some sort of accusation, rather than an observation about how Israel has become central in Jewish politics.

Regardless, again, Jewish Israelis should be allowed to speak about the place of Israel in Jewish political discourse. It cannot be up to non-Jewish Germans to judge if our view is acceptable.

Broad silencing of dissent in the name of the “anti-BDS fight”

We are again witness to the wild witch-hunt against anyone even hypothetically associated with the Palestinian-led BDS movement (for boycott, divestment, and sanctions against Israel).

In this instance, it appears that signing an open letter which criticized this very witch-hunt, written and signed by Jewish immigrants living in Leipzig (mostly Israelis), was enough for the IfZ group to conclude that the speaker was a “BDS supporter and trivializer.”

This should in itself be irrelevant, and no reason to deny a Jewish Israeli the opportunity to speak in public. But it is absurd to call anyone who signed that letter “BDS supporter and trivializer” – and the actual content of that letter is surprisingly relevant to this incident.

The open letter was written in May 2019 in protest of a proposal in Leipzig’s Stadtrat (city council) to forbid municipal funding and spaces from being used by any person or group “delegitimizing the right of Israel to exist as a Jewish state” – including, but not limited to, the BDS movement and related activities.

The letter emphasized the sweeping effects this proposal could have: broadly silencing, amongst others, Israeli dissenters, no matter what they actually wish to speak about – just as the IfZ has now demonstrated.

Germans define who is a “good Jew”

We also note again that the very same non-Jewish Germans who claim they wish to support Jewish people and stand in solidarity with us, instead take it upon themselves to decide who is a “good Jew” worthy of their support and who is not.

By making Israel politics a litmus test for political acceptability, groups like the IfZ place a special barrier of entry before a few groups that are marginalized in Germany: Jewish people, Palestinians, and other Middle Easterners. The issues around Jewish liberation, Zionism, Israeli occupation, and Palestinian resistance, are relevant to our lives more than to any other group – so of course we all have strong opinions on them.

While people from other backgrounds can easily get by without caring about these issues, we are subject to close scrutiny and judgment by white, christian-socialized Germans everywhere from the Bundestag to an insignificant Leipzig night club.

This is a form of discrimination and marginalization we face. It replicates the social power Germans have over Jews and many people with an immigrant background.

Humans are social beings. We need connection and community. As migrants, these are not automatic and not easy to come by in our chosen home. We are at a disadvantage compared with native Germans. And as marginalized people in a country in which white supremacist violence is still alive and killing, their support and solidarity is crucial for our safety.

By signalling some of us are not worthy of their support, they give us the choice of accepting more danger in isolation, or conforming to their expectations in order to be safe.

Suspicious attitudes

We are deeply disturbed by the spirit of mistrust, deception, and lack of communication throughout the IfZ incident.

Rather than welcoming Jewish people coming into their space to share, they investigate our background and discuss amongst themselves if our perspective is acceptable. Rather than being open to hearing our perspective, they cancel a workshop for fear we will say things they disagree with. 

And then, rather than being transparent and honest about their decision, they present a partial picture. They say clarification is needed, but do nothing to clarify. They ask for more time and never reply.

We get the sense that the IfZ did not feel concerned with being open, honest, and decent. Perhaps on some level they aren’t used to dealing with actual living Jewish people, or perhaps they felt uncomfortable with what they were doing.

Either way, this is not the kind of attitude that builds bridges and heals the wounds of the past.

Unreflected dominance

There is something ironic about the fact that a white-dominated, German-centered space in Germany takes issue with the statement that “the genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe” – and then uses this as a reason to deny a public speaking opportunity to a Jewish person in Europe.

A hundred years ago, before that destruction, Jewish people in this city would have had many spaces of our own to speak in. It is no coincidence that Jewish people here today are almost all immigrants, or that we have to rely on the good will of non-Jewish Germans for spaces and publicity.

We call on the IfZ and other progressive spaces in Leipzig to reflect on the fact that it is people with backgrounds like theirs who own and control such spaces, and people like us who have to ask to use them.

We call on people involved in these spaces to reflect on the barriers of entry they place upon people from marginalized backgrounds, and consider whether the struggle against antisemitism means that progressive Jews have to be kept under control – or be given your support.

German version / Deutsch

Workshop eines israelischen Linken wird vom IfZ abgesagt

Im Jahr 2020 sollte ein in Leipzig lebender israelisch-jüdischer Linke ein Workshop in einem lokalen Club halten, dem IfZ (Institut fuer Zukunft). Die Gastgeber sagten die Veranstaltung wenige Tage vor dem geplanten Termin abrupt ab.

Die Absage basierte auf den Meinungen des Referenten und auf dem Wortlaut der Workshop-Beschreibung:

Revolutionary Yiddishland: The Unrevised History of the Pre-war European Jewish Left
Before the genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe, and before the State of Israel came to dominate the politics of the remaining Jewish community, a great many young Jewish people in Europe were part of an internationalist Left fighting for the Revolution in Russia and Spain –– and struggling for a better world wherever they were. In this workshop, inspired by the book „Revolutionary Yiddishland,“ we will learn about this lost world and discuss how it was destroyed –– as well as what remains of it today.

Das IfZ nannte zwei Gründe für die Absage: Zum einen fand das IfZ Teile der Beschreibung „mehr als fragwürdig“ (more than questionable) – nämlich “genocidal violence of German imperialism destroyed Jewish life in Europe” („die völkermörderische Gewalt des deutschen Imperialismus zerstörte das jüdische Leben in Europa“) und “the State of Israel came to dominate the politics of the remaining Jewish community” („der Staat Israel ist in der Politik der verbliebenen jüdischen Gemeinschaft dominant geworden.“)

Weiter stellte das IfZ fest, dass der Referent zusammen mit anderen in Leipzig lebenden jüdischen Migranten (meist Israelis) einen offenen Brief an den Stadtrat unterzeichnet hatte, der ihrer Ansicht nach BDS „verharmlose“, während sich das IfZ „gegen BDS ausspricht.“

Später stellte sich heraus, dass in der internen Diskussion auch andere „Probleme“ angesprochen wurden als die, die offen mitgeteilt wurden: der Antizionismus und die „skurrilen Ansichten“ des Referenten sowie die Befürchtung, dass er die Gelegenheit nutzen würde, um Ansichten zu propagieren, die das IfZ ablehnt.

In der Absage meinte das IfZ, es bestehe Klärungsbedarf, aber es bleibe leider zu wenig Zeit. Darauf kam aber keine Einladung zum Dialog. Das IfZ gab an, dass es noch etwas Zeit brauche, um seine Position zu erklären, aber auch diese Klärung kam nie zustande.

JID lehnt das persönliche Silencing von israelischen Linken ab

Es gibt mehrere Dinge, die zu diesem empörenden Vorfall gesagt werden müssen.

Deutsche bringen jüdische Narrativen zum Schweigen

Die IfZ-Gruppe wandte sich gegen die Beschreibung der Shoah durch den Redner: „Die völkermörderische Gewalt des deutschen Imperialismus zerstörte das jüdische Leben in Europa.“

Aus historischer Sicht ist kein einziges Wort dieses Satzes besonders strittig. Wir fragen uns, was genau daran „mehr als fragwürdig“ sei. Unabhängig davon lehnen wir die Idee ab, dass nichtjüdische Deutsche diktieren dürfen, wie Juden über den deutschen Völkermord an unserem Volk sprechen. Tatsächlich erwarten und fordern wir, dass sie jüdischen Menschen erlauben, frei und laut darüber zu sprechen, dass sie zuhören und auf Dialog eingehen – und nicht versuchen, zu diktieren, welches Narrativ erlaubt ist.

Was den anderen Satz betrifft – „der Staat Israel ist in der Politik der verbliebenen jüdischen Gemeinschaft dominant geworden“ – dies ist eine ebenso unumstrittene Aussage, aber wir sind bereit, anzunehmen, dass dies ein einfaches Missverständnis aufgrund der Sprachbarriere ist. Vielleicht hat das IfZ “came to dominate” als eine Art Anschuldigung gelesen, statt als eine Beobachtung darüber, wie Israel in der jüdischen Politik zentral geworden ist.

Ungeachtet dessen sollte es jüdischen Israelis doch erlaubt sein, über den Platz Israels im jüdischen politischen Diskurs zu sprechen. Es kann nicht an nichtjüdischen Deutschen liegen, zu beurteilen, ob unsere Sichtweise akzeptabel ist.

Breites Unterdrücken von Dissens im Namen des „Anti-BDS-Kampfes“

Wir sehen in diesem Vorfall wieder die wilde Hexenjagd gegen jede:n, der:die auch nur hypothetisch mit der von Palästinensern geführten BDS-Bewegung (für Boykott, Desinvestition und Sanktionen gegen Israel) in Verbindung gebracht wird.

In diesem Fall scheint es, dass die Unterzeichnung eines offenen Briefes, der genau diese Hexenjagd kritisierte und von in Leipzig lebenden jüdischen Zuwanderern (meist Israelis) geschrieben und unterschrieben wurde, für die IfZ-Gruppe ausreichte, um zu dem Schluss zu kommen, dass der Sprecher ein „BDS-Unterstützer und Verharmloser“ sei.

Das sollte an sich irrelevant sein und kein Grund, einem jüdischen Israeli die Möglichkeit zu verweigern, in der Öffentlichkeit zu sprechen. Aber es ist absurd, jeden, der diesen Brief unterschrieben hat, als „BDS-Unterstützer und Verharmloser“ zu bezeichnen – und der eigentliche Inhalt dieses Briefes ist für diesen Vorfall erstaunlich relevant.

Der Offene Brief wurde im Mai 2019 aus Protest gegen einen Antrag im Leipziger Stadtrat geschrieben, der es verboten hat, städtische Mittel und Räume „Organisationen, Vereine und Personen,“ zur Verfügung zu stellen, „die die Existenz Israels als jüdischen Staat delegitimieren“ – einschließlich, aber nicht beschränkt auf die BDS-Kampagne.

Der Brief betonte die weitreichenden Auswirkungen, die dieser Vorschlag haben könnte: unter anderem israelische Andersdenkende weitgehend zum Schweigen zu bringen, egal, worüber sie eigentlich sprechen wollen – so wie es das IfZ jetzt demonstriert hat.

Deutsche definieren, wer ein:e „gute:r Jüd:in“ ist

Wir stellen auch schon wieder fest, dass dieselben nichtjüdischen Deutschen, die behaupten, jüdische Menschen unterstützen zu wollen und mit uns solidarisch zu sein, es stattdessen auf sich nehmen, zu entscheiden, wer ein:e „gute:r Jüd:in“ ist, der:de ihre Unterstützung verdient und wer nicht.

Indem Gruppen wie das IfZ die Israel-Politik zum Lackmustest für politische Akzeptanz machen, legen sie eine besondere Eintrittsbarriere vor einige wenige Gruppen, die in Deutschland marginalisiert sind: Jüd:innen, Palästinenser:innen und andere Menschen aus dem Nahen Osten. Die Themen rund um jüdische Befreiung, Zionismus, israelische Besatzung und palästinensischen Widerstand, sind für unser Leben relevanter als für jede andere Gruppe – also haben wir natürlich alle eine starke Meinung dazu.

Während Menschen mit anderem Hintergrund leicht damit zurechtkommen, ohne sich um diese Themen zu kümmern, werden wir von weißen, christlich-sozialisierten Deutschen überall vom Bundestag bis zu einem unbedeutenden Leipziger Club genau unter die Lupe genommen und beurteilt.

Dies ist eine Form der Diskriminierung und Ausgrenzung, der wir ausgesetzt sind. Sie repliziert die soziale Macht, die Deutsche über Juden und viele Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund haben.

Der Mensch ist ein soziales Wesen. Wir brauchen Verbindung und Gemeinschaft. Als Migranten sind diese für uns in unserer Wahlheimat nicht selbstverständlich und nicht leicht zu bekommen. Wir sind im Vergleich zu geborenen Deutschen benachteiligt. Und als marginalisierte Menschen in einem Land, in dem weiße Gewalt von rechts noch ganz lebendig am Morden ist, ist ihre Unterstützung und Solidarität entscheidend für unsere Sicherheit.

Indem sie signalisieren, dass einige von uns ihrer Unterstützung nicht würdig sind, stellen sie uns vor die Wahl, in der Isolation mehr Gefahr zu akzeptieren oder uns ihren Erwartungen anzupassen, um sicher zu sein.

Verdächtige Verhaltensweisen

Wir sind zutiefst beunruhigt über die Stimmung des Misstrauens, der Täuschung und der mangelnden Kommunikation während des IfZ-Vorfalls.

Anstatt jüdische Menschen willkommen zu heißen, die in ihren Raum kommen und teilen wollen, untersuchen sie unseren Hintergrund und diskutieren unter sich, ob unsere Perspektive akzeptabel ist. Anstatt offen dafür zu sein, unsere Perspektive zu hören, sagen sie einen Workshop ab, aus Angst, wir würden Dinge sagen, mit denen sie nicht einverstanden sind.

Und dann, anstatt transparent und ehrlich über ihre Entscheidung zu sein, stellen sie die Sache unvollständig dar. Sie sagen, dass eine Klärung erforderlich ist, tun aber nichts, um zu klären. Sie bitten um mehr Zeit und antworten nicht.

Wir haben das Gefühl, dass das IfZ sich nicht darum kümmerte, offen, ehrlich und anständig zu sein. Vielleicht sind sie es auf irgendeiner Ebene nicht gewohnt, mit tatsächlich lebenden jüdischen Menschen umzugehen, oder vielleicht fühlten sie sich schon selber unwohl bei dem, was sie taten.

So oder so, das ist nicht die Art von Haltung, die Brücken baut und die Wunden der Vergangenheit heilt.

Unreflektierte Dominanz

Es hat etwas Ironisches an sich, dass ein weiß-dominierter, biodeutsch-zentrierter Raum in Deutschland die Aussage problematisiert, dass „die völkermörderische Gewalt des deutschen Imperialismus das jüdische Leben in Europa zerstört hat“ – und dies dann als Grund benutzt, einer jüdischen Person in Europa eine öffentliche Redemöglichkeit zu verweigern.

Vor hundert Jahren, vor dieser Zerstörung, hätten jüdische Menschen in dieser Stadt viele eigene Räume gehabt, in denen wir hätten sprechen können. Es ist kein Zufall, dass die jüdischen Menschen hier heute fast alle Zuwanderer sind, oder dass wir auf das Wohlwollen der nichtjüdischen Deutschen angewiesen sind, wenn es um Räume und Öffentlichkeit geht.

Wir rufen das IfZ und andere progressive Räume in Leipzig dazu auf, darüber nachzudenken, dass es Menschen mit Hintergründen wie dem ihren sind, die solche Räume besitzen und kontrollieren, und Menschen wie wir, die darum bitten müssen, sie zu nutzen.

Wir rufen Menschen, die sich in diesen Räumen engagieren, dazu auf, über die Barrieren nachzudenken, die sie marginalisierten Menschen auferlegen, und darüber nachzudenken, ob der Kampf gegen Antisemitismus bedeutet, dass ihr progressive Juden unter Kontrolle halten werden müsst – oder sie unterstützen solltet.